The Christians of the Holy Land

Christians in the Holy Land constitute a mosaic of communities. Firstly, there is a great diversity of Christian confessions. Byzantine (or Greek) Orthodox and Catholic (who together make up the vast majority of Christians in the Holy Land), Roman (or Latin) Catholic, Maronites, Armenians, Syrian Orthodox and Catholic, Copts, Ethiopians, Anglicans, Lutherans and a plethora of Evangelical groups.

Secondly, there is a great diversity of origin as well as socio-cultural and linguistic contexts in which the Christians live:

– the local, rooted Christians of the Holy Land are for the most part Arabic speaking and live integrated within Palestinian and Jordanian Arab society;

– an important group of Christians are long term resident expatriates, many of whom serve in Church structures, religious orders and institutions. Most of the Christian hierarchical religious leadership is derived from this group;

– an increasing number of Christians in the Holy Land of diverse origins live within Jewish Israeli, Hebrew speaking society;

– a large number of Syrian and Iraqi refugees in Jordan;

– a large number of Christians have come to the Holy Land as migrants – labor migrants, coming predominantly from Asia, and asylum seekers, coming predominantly from Africa.